Summer dash to London

Having started a new job, I didn’t really want to take too much time off at once – not that I could anyways in my position :(. Anyways, we ended up with two 9 day trips this year, one to the Seychelles (photos coming) and one to the UK. It was great to go to England, felt so familiar somehow to me. I haven’t been there since I was small so it was about time. I can see the influence that UK has had on Australia, there are many similarities. Tourism is certainly on the next level in London. Good sights don’t have a couple hundred reviews on Google, more like 58,000 reviews, some sights have queues a couple of kilometers long… No matter, our fault for going in August!

London by night. 5D Mark III | 12-24mm 4.0 Art

We started with three days in London, and got a hotel in the middle of the city. From there we hit all the “must sees”. It was awesome, nice people, and fantastic sights which really live up to their reputation. England really has the best museums in the world. Some places were super busy however, and I would recommend not coming in high season as we did. We used the Tube to get around.. nice and cheap, but my god its horrible. Its TINY, and full of smoke, dust and vibration. You need ear muffs or your ears will bleed! In a nation which takes health and safety so highly, it is obvious that a blind eye is given to the Tube.

London. 5D Mark III | 12-24mm 4.0 Art

We then hired a car and drove to Oxford, then the Cotswolds, Bath and finally down to Dorset. We spent 4-5 days on this trip before heading back to London. It was fantastic, and I really enjoyed all the old architecture along the way. My favorite place was probably Bath. It is such a dynamic university town, and yet has some amazing old Roman sights. Well worth a visit.

Cotswolds England, 5D Mark III | 24mm 1.4 Art

Roman Baths, England. 5D Mark III | 12-24mm 4.0 Art

I did get so do a little landscape photography which is very popular in the UK. The below image is from Durdle Door in Dorset. Its a great location, and I used the Zeiss 18mm 2.8 Milvus and the LEE Little Stopper to get a nice long exposure.

Durdle Door, Dorset, England. 5D Mark III | 18mm 2.8 Zeiss Milvus

Had a great trip so check out the full album here!

Full Album

Oh Canada!

I had a business event in Vancouver recently and decided to add in a weekend for the trip – why not! So I brought my gear along and took a few photos from Vancouver, Squamish and Whistler. Really a wonderful part of the world! Vancouver is a lovely city, which reminds me a little of Brisbane in Australia. The scenery is much better though!!

I must have walked about 25km around Vancouver and Stanley park, but it was awesome. I was also lucky with the weather.I highly recommend a trip and will certainly need to go back again.

So anyways, these were quick and dirty shots on a business trip, and the light was very harsh, so don’t expect perfection but here are my favorites!

Top of Sea to Sky Gondola. Squamish, Canada. 5D Mark III | Zeiss 18mm 2.8 | Polariser

 

Downtown Vancouver Canada. 5D Mark III | 35mm 1.4 Art

 

Scenic flights. Vancouver, Canada. 5D Mark III | 100-400mm 4.5-5.6L IS II

 

Whistler, Canada. 5D Mark III | 18mm 2.8 Carl Zeiss Milvus.

 

Whistler, Canada. 5D Mark III | 18mm 2.8 Carl Zeiss Milvus.

 

Whistler, Canada. 5D Mark III | 100-400mm 4.5-5.6L IS II

 

Check out the full gallery here:

Full Gallery

 

 

Moon Eclipse July 2018

Being in Bavaria has many benefits, but on this occasion it was a good opportunity to see the Blood Moon, or full Moon Eclipse in July 2018. I headed for a nearby hill top, and this is the result!

Moon Eclipse 2018. Bavaria, 5D Mark III & 100-400mm 4.5-5.6L IS II

Mars was clearly visible and was a joy to look at.

Happy Shooting!

 

U-Bahn

A while back I posted the below photo of Marienplatz, part of the Munich U-Bahn network. I promised that I would do a project on that one day. Well many moons have past, but finally I was able to go back and work a little more on the project.

Marienplatz station, Munich U-Bahn. 5D Mark III with 16-35mm 2.8L II

So what was the occasion? Well there was one, I managed to get the final piece of my new wide angle kit. I no longer use the 16-35mm 2.8L II but have changed to the Zeiss Milvus 18mm 2.8 and the Sigma 12-24mm 4.0 Art. The 12-24mm is the final piece, and it’s ideal for U-Bahn photography! I have only taken about 100 shots with it so far, but I can confirm that the Sigma 12-24 is really special. It is better than I expected, and has surprisingly low distortion, very uniform and high degree of sharpness… Its lovely to use. I can also say it’s bigger and heavier than I thought :(. When I have a few more keepers from the lens I will write a separate post on the Sigma 12-24mm 4.0 Art lens.

Sigma 12-24mm f4.0 Art lens. Photo from Digital Photography School: https://digital-photography-school.com/thoughts-field-test-sigma-12-24mm-art-lens/ Check out the review in the link!

 

Back to the U-Bahn! I spent an evening on the network, and took the U1, U2 and U3 around a bit. I got an all day ticket called the Munich XXL for 8.90 Euros. That allowed me to use all the U-Bahn, S-Bahn and buses. I was out from 9:30pm till 12:30am but really I could have used a lot more time. I will need to come back again. The U-Bahn was introduced in 1971, and has been added to ever since. There are 96 stations and over 100km of track. Many of the stations are wonderfully designed, and this is much of the photography appeal. Due to my time restrictions on this occasion, I was only able to photograph three stations! So here are my favorites from the evening:

Munich U-Bahn. Westfriedhof Station. Canon 5D Mark III with Sigma 12-24mm 4.0 Art @ 12mm

 

Munich U-Bahn. Scheidplatz. Canon 5D Mark III with Sigma 12-24mm 4.0 Art @ 12mm

 

Munich U-Bahn. Hasenbergl Station. Canon 5D Mark III with Sigma 12-24mm 4.0 Art @ 12mm

Below is a gallery from the night. Happy Shooting! Don’t forget to like and share my work!

 

Donate a coffee!

Buy me a coffee! I can only take great photos and produce all this awesome content when I am fueled up on coffee.

€3.00

Gallery:

 

A weekend in Monaco!

Heard a lot about Monaco, so we had to check it out! This tiny little nation has more millionaires and billionaires than anywhere else in the world. Often thought of as snobby and expensive – maybe, but Monaco is really quite charming. There are beautiful gardens and parks on every corner, it is modern, clean and tidy. It reminds me in some ways of Sydney.

Monaco. Canon 5D Mark III | 100-400mm 4.5-5.6L IS II

Monte Carlo Casino, Monaco. Canon 5D Mark III | 18mm 2.8 Zeiss Milvus

We combined our visit with some surrounding areas close of Monaco. Its a very nice part of the world, with great weather and coastline. We had a good time, so check out my photos in the gallery below!

 

SEE FULL ALBUM

 

 

Bavarian Summer

So far its been a wonderful summer in Bavaria. The best thing is that we are only half way through. Here are some everyday shots to share! Hope you enjoy.

A Guide to Vietnamese Coffee

A little known fact is that Vietnam is a huge coffee producer, ranking second in the world for coffee exports. The Vietnamese have a great coffee culture, if a little different from more conventional coffee fans. This love of coffee was originally introduced by the French, but today is truly unique.

Vietnamese coffee is typically a coarse ground strong and flavourful coffee. If you like strong coffee go to Vietnam, it’s the strongest coffee you will ever have. In the old days, the French colonists could not get normal milk, so condensed milk was used instead. Today you can get a range of coffees in Vietnam, from egg coffee to fruit coffee, weasel coffee to yoghurt coffee.

I took a few photos of how we prepare Vietnamese coffee (Ca Phe Sua). This is how we have learnt it from the locals, and certainly not the only way. You will need the following:

  • Vietnamese coffee, we use Trung Nguyen
  • Vietnamese coffee filter
  • Glass or cup, depending on the type of coffee made
  • Hot water
  • Condensed and sweetened milk (for Ca Phe Sua)
  • Tea spoon!

Step 1

Take out the top filter in the Vietnamese coffee maker. Add 2-3 tea spoons of Vietnamese ground coffee.

Step 2

Use the top filter to compress the coffee a little. You do not need to apply a lot of pressure. Leave the filter press on top of the coffee.

Step 3

Put the coffee maker on top of a glass or cup. Pour in a little hot water, just enough to moisten and swell the coffee. Wait 20 seconds, before filling up the entire filter. This delay is to allow the coffee to expand and prevent the water passing through the coffee too quickly. Failing this step can lead to poor taste.

Step 4

Monitor the progress of the water, and when all the water has filtered through the coffee is ready. If you like a white coffee then add one tea spoon of condensed milk, and stir up. If you like black coffee then drink as is, however black coffees are enjoyed cold in Vietnam. Typically the filtered coffee is poured into a glass filled 50% up with ice cubes.

Step 5

Enjoy!!